Crooners

In the US and UK crooners occupied the world stage for a short period of time, from the 1920’s to the 1960’s and then were gone.  Since I grew up in their hey-day, during the 1950’s, I have always been fascinated and attracted to them.  Here is a paean to the crooners.

A crooner is a male singer who sings predominantly romantic ballads and slurs some notes and syllables to make them sound sexy.  So for example, Frank Sinatra had excellent enunciation, you could hear every word, not like rock n’roll, but when it came to certain words, he would slur them, such as “moon” in the song “East of the Sun and West of the Moon,” the word is pronounced something like “moooon.”  When this style first became popular it was criticized by the establishment and the Church, but it represented the early economic power of youth culture, they bought tickets and records.  It was the invention of the microphone that enabled the crooners to develop their intimate style.

I first learnt about the crooners from an unlikely source, when I worked on Sat mornings in a men’s wear store down the Roman Road in Bethnal Green.  The manager of the store had a voice just like Bing Crosby.  He used to serenade the customers and induce them to buy.  He had been in showbiz for a while, but no-one wanted a copy of Bing Crosby.  But thru him I developed an appreciation for the older origins of crooning. The early Bing Crosby was great, when he really had a voice, not using style only as later on.  But, the origins of crooning preceded Bing.

Here is a  list of crooners, roughly in chronological order (this is not meant to be a comprehensive list):

  • Al Jolson – deep voice, from Washington DC, father was a cantor, included African-American elements in his singing, first hit was Swanee, 1920, active 1904-1950
  • Eddie Cantor – singer and comedian, active 1907-62
  • Hoagy Carmichael – singer and famous song-writer, active 1918-82
  • Louis Armstrong, famous for his gravelly voice and jazzy style, active 1919-71
  • Rudy Vallee – musician with early crooning style, active 1924-74
  • Al Bowlly – famous British crooner, active 1927-41
  • Sammy Davis Jr. – popular singer and entertainer, active 1928-90
  • Mel Tormé – popular jazz singer, active 1929-96
  • Dick Powell – influential singer and actor, active 1930-63
  • Bing Crosby – Dean of the crooners, cultivated relaxed, intimate style, active 1931-54
  • Fred Astaire – classy dancer and singer, active 1932-81
  • Frankie Laine – versatile popular singer, active 1932-2005
  • Perry Como – popular Italian-American singer with relaxed style, active 1932-67
  • Nat “King” Cole – musician and singer, active 1934-65
  • Tex Beneke – popular singer, sang with Glenn Miller, active 1935-75
  • Frank Sinatra – most famous crooner, inimitable style, active 1935-95
  • Dick Haymes – Born in Argentina, sang with Tommy Dorsey, active 1935-56
  • Gene Kelly – famous dancer and singer, active 1938-942
  • Andy Williams – popular singer and entertainer, 1938-2012
  • Billy Eckstine – popular jazz singer, active 1939-90
  • Dean Martin – popular Italian-American entertainer, active 1940-91
  • Tony Bennett – versatile singer and entertainer, active 1945-2015
  • Vic Damone – popular singer, active 1947-2000
  • Eddie Fisher – singer actor, active 1948-2010
  • Johnnie Ray – precursor to rock n’roll, active 1951-89
  • Pat Boone – popular singer and entertainer, active 1954-pres.
  • Johnny Mathis – acclaimed popular singer, active 1956-pres.
  • Steve Lawrence – singer in duo with wife Eydie Gourme, active 1957-pres.
  • Tom Jones  – Welsh, popular singer 1963-pres.
  • Jim Morrison – influential 60’s singer, active 1963-71
  • Barry Manilow – pop music singer, songwriter, 1964-pres.
  • Julio Iglesias – Spanish singer and song-writer, active 1968-pres.
  • Harry Connick Jr.  – Sinatra sound-alike, active 1977-pres.
  • Michael Feinstein – singer-pianist, revived classic American music, active 1986-pres.

My favorite crooner, apart from Frankie, is Al Bowlly, perhaps because my father used to sound like him.  His life story is extraordinary.  His Lebanese Christian father and Dutch mother met on a boat going to Australia.  They were married on board, and left the ship in Mozambique, where Al was born.   Then they moved to S. Africa where Al grew up.  He started singing with a band and when they got a job aboard a cruise ship he joined them.  But, a disagreement resulted in him being left in Saigon, Vietnam, where to survive he became a dockworker.  Later the band toured Germany in the 1930’s and he received a telegram to join them.  He sang in Berlin and was heard by an English critic who arranged for him to go to London to record.  His recordings were very successful and so he moved to London.  He was the most popular British crooner of the 1930’s-40’s.  He was killed by a German bomb in his apartment London in 1941.

Another aspect of the crooners was their backing music.  In the 1920’s it was typical syncopated rhythm, with the usual cymbals at the end of a stanza.  But, then came the big bands of the 1940’s and the crooners sang with them, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorset, etc.  Finally when the crooners were established and successful, they commanded their own orchestras and arrangers, like Frank Sinatra with Nelson Riddle and Axel Stordahl.

It was a short but glorious entertainment epoch.

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2 thoughts on “Crooners

  1. All the crooners were wonderful, the most beautiful music accompanied by those melodious voices. What about the ladies like Doris Day, they also were making such great music. Frankie is still the king.

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  2. I loved this Ja ck. Sorry I missed your visit to Netanya. Glad you are well in your new surroundings. Always love to Naomi even though she cannot accept it. Linda hirsch

    Like

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